Cultural Heritage News


  • 06 May 2012 8:43 PM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Archaeologists accuse MoD of allowing US company to 'plunder' shipwreck

    Experts take legal advice in effort to block lucrative deal on underwater excavation of HMS Victory

    An image of what HMS Victory is thought to have looked like issued by Odyssey Marine Exploration in 2009. Photograph: John Batchelor/Odyssey Marine/PA

    The Ministry of Defence is facing a legal battle and parliamentary questions after letting a US company excavate a British 18th-century warship laden with a potentially lucrative cargo.

    Lord Renfrew is among leading archaeologists condemning a deal struck over HMS Victory, considered the world's mightiest ship when she sank in the Channel in 1744.

     

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2012/may/06/hms-victory-shipwreck-odyssey-excavation?newsfeed=true

  • 05 May 2012 11:23 AM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Italian court upholds claim on Getty bronze

    Official in Italy hopes the ruling will lend weight to new negotiations for the return of the masterpiece Greek statue.

    An Italian court has upheld an order for the seizure of a masterpiece of the J. Paul Getty Museum's antiquities collection, finding that the bronze statue of a victorious athlete was illegally exported from Italy before the museum purchased it for $4 million in 1976.

    The ruling Thursday by a regional magistrate in Pesaro will likely prolong the legal battle over the statue, a signature piece of the Getty's embattled antiquities collection whose return Italian authorities have sought for years.

     

    http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/culture/la-et-getty-bronze-ruling-20120504,0,2759444.story

  • 03 May 2012 8:37 AM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)
     

    Suit over Norton Simon artwork enters a final phase

    An art dealer's daughter-in-law appeals to the 9th Circuit to lay claim to the diptych 'Adam and Eve' at the Pasadena museum. It was stolen by Goering in World War II.

    'Adam and Eve'

    Lucas Cranach the Elder's 14th century diptych "Adam and Eve." (Norton Simon Museum / May 2, 2012)

    A long-running lawsuit to force the Norton Simon Museum to surrender one of its prized artworks, 480-year-old paired paintings of Adam and Eve by Lucas Cranach the Elder that were looted during the Holocaust, has reached what could be its last legal round: plaintiff Marei Von Saher's recent appeal to the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.

    If her appeal fails, it could have far-reaching implications, potentially undermining a larger class of claims to recover Nazi-looted art.

    http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/culture/la-et-norton-simon-holocaust-20120502,0,110387.story

  • 02 May 2012 1:23 PM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Ancient American Skeletons Safe From Reburial, But Only for the Moment

    on 1 May 2012, 4:12 PM |

    Bones of contention. Scientists want to study these 9000-year-old bones, but the Kumeyaay tribes claim them for reburial.

    Credit: Jan Austin/Santa Monica Community College

    " href="http://news.sciencemag.org/scienceinsider/2012/05/01/si-remains.jpg" jquery1335979381351="41">si-remains.jpg
    Bones of contention. Scientists want to study these 9000-year-old bones, but the Kumeyaay tribes claim them for reburial.
    Credit: Jan Austin/Santa Monica Community College
     

    A federal court judge in San Francisco granted a temporary restraining order Friday to prevent the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), from handing over 9000-year-old human bones to Native Americans, in the latest twist in an unusual custody battle for two human skeletons that are among the earliest found in the Americas. Three University of California professors filed a lawsuit last week to prevent UCSD from transferring the bones, which have been described as better preserved than those of the Kennewick Man, another ancient skeleton that has been the center of debate and lawsuits.

    The restraining order will be in effect until Friday, 11 May, when Judge Richard Seeborg of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California will decide whether to extend it until the case is settled, according to Jim McManis, an attorney in San Jose, California, who represents the professors pro bono.

    http://news.sciencemag.org/scienceinsider/2012/05/ancient-american-skeletons-safe.html?ref=hp

  • 02 May 2012 7:55 AM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)
     

    Syria's cultural treasures latest uprising victim

    The Associated Press

    2:56 p.m. Tuesday, May 1, 2012

    BEIRUT undefined On its towering hilltop perch, the Krak des Chevaliers, one of the world's best preserved Crusader castles, held off a siege by the Muslim warrior Saladin nearly 900 years ago. It was lauded by Lawrence of Arabia for its beauty and has been one of the crown jewels of Syria's tourism.

    But it has fallen victim to the chaos of Syria's uprising and the crackdown against it by President Bashar Assad's regime. Recently, gunmen broke into the castle, threw out the staff and began excavations to loot the site, says Bassam Jammous, general director of the Antiquities and Museum Department in Damascus.

    Syria's turmoil is threatening the country's rich archaeological heritage, experts warn.

    http://www.ajc.com/news/nation-world/syrias-cultural-treasures-latest-1429366.html?printArticle=y

  • 27 Apr 2012 7:56 AM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Austria-Mexico Treaty Could Facilitate Loan of Feathered Crown


    VIENNA – The Austrian government has approved a bilateral pact with Mexico governing the loan of cultural artifacts, an agreement that could pave the way for a headdress believed to have been worn by Aztec ruler Montezuma II to be temporarily brought to the Latin American country.

    The treaty, negotiated over nearly two years and approved earlier this week by Austria’s Cabinet, is aimed at resolving a decades-long dispute over the spectacular feather-work crown, a spokesman for Austria’s Culture and Education Ministry told Efe Thursday.

    The goal is to “create international legal certainties regarding temporary loans of cultural property,” the spokesman said.

    The treaty, negotiated between each country’s ministries of Culture and Foreign Affairs, does not address the matter of ownership over any cultural objects that may be loaned out, he said.

    http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=498266&CategoryId=14091

  • 26 Apr 2012 2:17 PM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    ICE returns stolen and looted art and antiquities to Italy

    ICE returns stolen and looted art and antiquities to Italy

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    WASHINGTON undefined Seven stolen and looted objects of Italian cultural heritage will soon be on their way back to Italy, following a ceremony Thursday in which U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Janet Napolitano officially returned the antiquities to Italian Ambassador Claudio Bisogniero at the Embassy of Italy in Washington.

    Two 2,000-year-old ceramic vessels, one Roman marble sculpture, one Renaissance painting and three music sheets from choir books dating back to the 13th century were recovered during four investigations by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI). All four of the investigations involved the collaboration of HSI offices in New York and Rome and Italy's national police force, the Carabinieri.

    http://content.govdelivery.com/bulletins/gd/USDHSICE-3db182

  • 26 Apr 2012 10:48 AM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)
    Accession by Palestine to the Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict, its First Protocol (The Hague, 14 May 1954) and its Second Protocol (The Hague, 26 March 1999)

    On 22 March 2012, Palestine deposited with the Director-General its instrument of accession to the Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict and its two Protocols.
    In accordance with the terms of Article 33(2) of the Convention, Article 10(b) of its First Protocol and Article 43(2), the Convention and its two Protocols will enter into force with respect to Palestine three months after the deposit of these instruments, that is to say on 22 June 2012.


    http://portal.unesco.org/en/ev.php-URL_ID=48870&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html
  • 26 Apr 2012 10:45 AM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)
    Ratification by Palestine of the Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property (Paris, 14 November 1970)

    On 22 March 2012, Palestine deposited with the Director-General its instrument of ratification of the Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property.

    In accordance with the terms of Article 21, the Convention will enter into force with respect to Palestine three months after the deposit of the instrument of ratification, that is to say on 22 June 2012.

     

    http://portal.unesco.org/en/ev.php-URL_ID=48869&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html



  • 25 Apr 2012 6:08 PM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Art Market Italy: Stories of theft and recovery      
    Written by Silvia Anna Barrilà    
    Wednesday, 25 April 2012 14:09 


    Francesco 'Pacecco' De Rosa (1607-1656), 'Fuga in Egitto,' oil on canvas, image courtesy Galleria Nazionale di Cosenza

    MILAN, Italy - It was probably during a trip through southern Italy in the 4th century BC that the small late Egyptian stone known as “Horus on the Crocodiles” went missing. It was, by all appearances, a talisman against snakes, crocodiles, and scorpions owned by a traveler. Many centuries later, at the end of the 1970s, the object was recovered during a dig in the city of Crotone, in the region of Calabria, by a worker who recognized the rarity of the stone and decided to keep it.

    The worker was so proud of it that he always carried it in a small bag hanging around his neck and used every opportunity to show it off, until someone stole it from him.
     


    Read more: http://acn.liveauctioneers.com/index.php/columns-and-international/artmarketitaly/7130-art-market-italy-stories-of-theft-and-recovery#ixzz1t5nbsxzM

 
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